Leadership

Do Ports Know What’s Coming?

Do Ports Know What’s Coming? Ports can use economic data to their advantage if they know where to look By Meredith Martino One of the hallmarks of the global financial crisis of 2008 is that so few people saw it coming. The indicators were not pointing toward doom. Yet, there were those who managed to look at the information underpinning ...

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A Paradigm Shift

Technology trends in automation are changing how work is done at ports and terminals By Kathy A. Smith As automation begins to play a larger role at port terminals in order for seaborne trade to move faster, the impact will undoubtedly be felt by the labor workforce as jobs become less labor-intensive and more computer-based. Yet this paradigm shift won’t ...

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Building a Strong Brand

Ports recognize that who they are and what they stand for is as critical as how they look By Meredith Martino Many ports live and die by their numbers: container throughput, volume of cargo, value of cargo, regional jobs, truck turn times, economic impact, tax revenue generated and so on and so forth. But numbers don’t tell the story of ...

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Laying a Foundation for Success

Corporate social responsibility projects throughout Latin America set the region on a course for success By Tom Hranac While port operations remain and will essentially always be an exercise in moving cargo, ports throughout Central and South America are effectively responding to rising expectations from a variety of stakeholders about the subsequent effects of their maritime activities. As semi-public entities obligated to meet ...

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What Will Ports Look Like in the Future?

Ports across the country are strategically planning to lead the way in emerging technologies, sustainability guidelines and energy By Kathy A. Smith The push for ports to evolve as technologically-advanced entities that adhere to increasingly strict environmental protocols while providing cost-effective and efficient service to their customers is no small task. But the job has become easier thanks to a ...

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Opportunities Abound for Ports Amid Shifting Trade Lanes

Growing markets, shifting manufacturing centers and major infrastructure projects keep global trade lanes in flux By Meredith Martino Eight years ago, AAPA hosted a workshop in partnership with the U.S. Maritime Administration designed to give attendees a look at “Shifting International Trade Routes,” especially those anticipated to occur because of the newly-begun expansion of the Panama Canal. The program proved ...

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Cruise Lines Set Sail for Growth

By Sarah Sain According to Cruise Market Watch, the cruise industry worldwide has had an annual average passenger growth rate of 7 percent from 1990 to 2018. Growth to date has been driven by new ships with larger capacities, ship diversification, more local ports, more destinations and new on-board/on-shore activities that match demands of passengers. A total of six new ...

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In Case of Emergency

Ports focus on disaster and continuity of operations planning in order to be prepared for the unexpected. By Kathy A. Smith When it comes to being prepared for an incident at any seaport, no matter the size or scope, comprehensive risk assessment, along with detailed planning, training and debriefing is critical. Planning involves the cooperation of a plethora of port ...

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Partners in Fighting Crime

Port Fourchon’s Harbor Police and IT staff team up to enhance security and disaster response with the GLPC-C4 Maritime Domain Awareness System. By Sarah Sain More and more these days, port police are working hand in hand with a previously unlikely partner: the port’s IT department. As technology plays a larger role in fighting crime in general, these two groups ...

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Public Sector Agencies with Private Sector Expectations

Recruiting and retaining high-quality employees at public ports requires addressing unique challenges. By Meredith Martino Most project managers acknowledge the triple constraints of their work, sometimes called the Iron Triangle: quality, time and cost. If a project is of high quality and completed quickly, it’s going to cost a lot. If it’s completed quickly and at low cost, the quality ...

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